0000-00-00 00:00:00

Best Deals & Download PDF eBook Invented Cities: The Creation of Landscape in Nineteenth-Century New York and Boston by Mona Domosh

Invented Cities: The Creation of Landscape in Nineteenth-Century New York and Boston by Mona Domosh

Page Updated:
Book Views: 8

Author
Mona Domosh
Publisher
Yale University Press
Date of release
Pages
200
ISBN
9780300074918
Binding
Paperback
Illustrations
Format
PDF, EPUB, MOBI, TXT, DOC
Rating
3
52

Advertising

Get eBOOK
Invented Cities: The Creation of Landscape in Nineteenth-Century New York and Boston

Find and Download Book

Click one of share button to proceed download:
Choose server for download:
Download
Get It!
File size:12 mb
Estimated time:2 min
If not downloading or you getting an error:
  • Try another server.
  • Try to reload page — press F5 on keyboard.
  • Clear browser cache.
  • Clear browser cookies.
  • Try other browser.
  • If you still getting an error — please contact us and we will fix this error ASAP.
Sorry for inconvenience!
For authors or copyright holders
Amazon Affiliate

Go to Removal form

Leave a comment

Book review

Why do cities look the way they do? In this intriguing new book, Mona Domosh seeks to answer this question by comparing the strikingly different landscapes of two great American cities, Boston and New York. Although these two cities appeared to be quite similar through the eighteenth century, distinctive characteristics emerged as social and economic differences developed. Domosh explores the physical differences between Boston and New York, comparing building patterns and architectural styles to show how a society’s vision creates its own distinctive urban form. Cities, Domosh contends, are visible representations of individual and group beliefs, values, tensions, and fears.

Using an interdisciplinary approach that encompasses economics, politics, architecture, historical and cultural geography, and urban studies, Domosh shows how the middle and upper classes of Boston and New York, the "building elite," inscribed their visions of social order and social life on four landscape features during the latter half of the nineteenth century: New York’s retail district and its commercial skyscrapers, and Boston’s Back Bay and its Common and park system. New York’s self-expression translated into unlimited commercial and residential expansion, conspicuous consumption, and architecture designed to display wealth and prestige openly. Boston, in contrast, focused more on culture. The urban gentry limited skyscraper construction, prevented commercial development of Boston Common, and maintained homes and parks near the business district. Many fascinating lithographs illustrate the two cities’ contrasting visions.


Readers reviews