0000-00-00 00:00:00

Best Deals & Download PDF eBook Monitored Peril: Asian Americans and the Politics of TV Representation by Darrell Y. Hamamoto

Monitored Peril: Asian Americans and the Politics of TV Representation by Darrell Y. Hamamoto

Page Updated:
Book Views: 14

Author
Darrell Y. Hamamoto
Publisher
Univ Of Minnesota Press
Date of release
Pages
326
ISBN
9780816623693
Binding
Paperback
Illustrations
Format
PDF, EPUB, MOBI, TXT, DOC
Rating
4
20

Advertising

Get eBOOK
Monitored Peril: Asian Americans and the Politics of TV Representation

Find and Download Book

Click one of share button to proceed download:
Choose server for download:
Download
Get It!
File size:10 mb
Estimated time:1 min
If not downloading or you getting an error:
  • Try another server.
  • Try to reload page — press F5 on keyboard.
  • Clear browser cache.
  • Clear browser cookies.
  • Try other browser.
  • If you still getting an error — please contact us and we will fix this error ASAP.
Sorry for inconvenience!
For authors or copyright holders
Amazon Affiliate

Go to Removal form

Leave a comment

Book review

Early in the movement of Asian labour to the United States, immigrants from the Far East were viewed by the dominant Euro-American society as a peril to a white, Christian nation. How far have we come since then? This first comprehensive study of Asian-American representation on network television supplies some unsettling answers. A meticulous work of history, cultural criticism, and political analysis, "Monitored Peril" illuminates the unstable relationship between the discursive practices of commercial television programmes, liberal democratic values, and white supremacist ideology. The book clearly demonstrates the pervasiveness of racialized discourse throughout US society, especially as it is reproduced by network television. In treating his topic, Darrell Hamamoto addresses a wide variety of issues facing diverse Asian-American communities: interracial conflict, conservative politics, US-Japan trade friction, and post-colonial Vietnam. Through an examination of selected programs from the 1950s to the present, he attempts to correct the consistently distorted optic of network television. Finally, he calls for an engaged independent Asian American media practice, and for the expansion of public sector television.


Readers reviews